WordPress is a popular content management system that is used by various websites worldwide. However, as with any other software, it may encounter errors and issues that cause users to become frustrated. In this article, we will go over some of the most common 21 WordPress errors and how to fix them. By understanding these common issues and their solutions, you can ensure that your website runs smoothly and without issues.

1. White Screen of Death (WSOD):

One of the most common WordPress errors is the white screen of death. This error occurs when a blank white screen appears instead of your website.

To fix this, you can try disabling all the plugins and then reactivating them one by one to see which is causing the issue. Another solution is to increase your PHP memory limit by editing your wp-config.php files or contacting your hosting provider for assistance.

2. 404 Page Not Found Error:

404 Page Not Found Error Is another WordPress error, which occurs when a user tries to access a page on your website that does not exist or has been deleted.

To fix this error, you can try resetting your permalinks by going to Settings > Permalinks and clicking “Save Changes.” If that doesn’t work, check for any broken links within your content or plugins that may be causing the issue. You can also use a redirection plugin to redirect users from old URLs to new ones.

3. Error Establishing a Database Connection:

One of the most common WordPress errors is “error establishing a database connection”. This error occurs when your website cannot connect to the database, which can happen for various reasons.

To fix this error, you can try checking your login credentials and making sure that they are correct. You can also check if your database server running properly or restart if needed. Another solution could be repairing your database using phpMyAdmin or contacting your hosting provider for assistance.

4. Internal Server Error (HTTP 500):

One of the most common WordPress errors is the Internal Server Error (HTTP 500). This error can occur due to various reasons such as a corrupted .htaccess file, plugin conflicts, or insufficient memory limit.

To fix this error, you can try renaming your .htaccess file and deactivating all plugins. If that doesn’t work, increasing your PHP memory limit may solve the issue.

5. Too Many Redirects Error:

When implementing best practices for wordpress security, it’s crucial to address common issues such as too many redirect errors. These errors often stem from conflicting redirects on your website, creating a loop and impeding visitor access.

To resolve this, consider employing security measures like regularly clearing your browser’s cache and cookies or disabling recently installed plugins. Additionally, inspect your .htaccess file for any misconfigurations and rectify them. If the issue persists, seeking assistance from your hosting provider to address potential server-side problems is advisable. Prioritizing these security practices helps ensure a smoother and more secure WordPress experience for both site administrators and visitors.

6. Syntax Error in WordPress:

A syntax error is one of the most common errors encountered by WordPress users. This can occur when there is an issue with the code in your theme or plugin files.

To fix this, you must locate and correct the problematic line of code using FTP or cPanel file manager. Another option is to revert to a previous version of your theme or plugin that did not have any issues. It’s also important to regularly update your themes and plugins to avoid potential conflicts and errors.

7. Briefly Unavailable for Scheduled Maintenance Error:

One of the most common WordPress errors is the “Briefly Unavailable for Scheduled Maintenance” error. This occurs when a plugin or theme update is being installed and your site goes into maintenance mode, but something interrupts the process and it gets stuck in this state.

To fix this error, you can try deleting the .maintenance file from your root directory using an FTP client or by accessing your server’s cPanel. If that doesn’t work, you can also try manually updating all plugins and themes on your site to ensure they are compatible with each other.

8. Upload Failed: Could Not Write to Disk Error:

One common error that WordPress users may encounter is the “Upload Failed: Could Not Write to Disk” error. This can occur when trying to upload files or images to your website.

The first step in fixing this error is to check if there is enough disk space available on your server. If not, you will need to free up some space or upgrade your hosting plan. Another possible cause of this error could be incorrect file permissions. Make sure that the wp-content/uploads folder has proper write permissions (usually 755)

9. WordPress Memory Exhausted Error:

One of the most common WordPress errors is the “WordPress Memory Exhausted Error.” This error occurs when your website has exceeded its memory limit, causing it to crash.

To fix this issue, you can try increasing the PHP memory limit by editing your wp-config.php file or contacting your hosting provider for assistance. Another solution is to deactivate any recently installed plugins that may be using too much memory. It’s also important to regularly update WordPress and its plugins to avoid encountering this error in the future.

10. 403 Forbidden Error:

One of the most common WordPress errors is the 403 Forbidden Error. This error occurs when a user does not have permission to access a specific page or file on your website.

To fix this error, you can try resetting your site’s permissions by changing the folder and file permissions in File Manager or using an FTP client. If that doesn’t work, you may need to check for any conflicting plugins or themes that could be causing the issue. Another solution is to add an index.php file to the directory where the error is occurring, which will allow visitors to see a list of files instead of receiving an error message.

11. 502 Bad Gateway Error:

One of the most common WordPress errors is the 502 Bad Gateway Error. This error occurs when there is a problem with communication between servers, resulting in an incomplete or incorrect response being sent to your browser.

To fix this error, you can try clearing your cache and cookies, checking for any faulty plugins or themes, increasing your PHP memory limit, or contacting your hosting provider for assistance. It’s important to address this error promptly as it can affect the functionality and accessibility of your website.

12. Connection Timed Out Error:

When working with WordPress, users often encounter the “Connection Timed Out” error, a common issue stemming from a delayed response by the website, leading to a server timeout. Various factors, such as a sluggish internet connection or high site traffic, can contribute to this problem.

To resolve this issue, consider adjusting your PHP memory limit or deactivating plugins that might be impeding your site’s speed. Additionally, it’s worthwhile to check with your hosting provider for any server-related issues that may require attention. Incorporating wordpress version control essentials can also help streamline the management of your site and enhance its overall performance.

13. Failed to Open Stream Error:

One of the most common WordPress errors is the “Failed to Open Stream” error. This error occurs when a file or directory cannot be accessed by WordPress, usually due to incorrect permissions.

To fix this error, you can try changing the permissions of the affected files or directories to 755 or 644. Another solution is to check if there are any plugins causing conflicts and deactivate them one by one until the issue is resolved. It’s also important to keep your WordPress site updated with the latest version and regularly back up your website in case of any future errors.

14. Sidebar Below Content Error:

One common error that WordPress users may encounter is the Sidebar Below Content Error. This occurs when the sidebar of a website appears below the main content instead of beside it.

To fix this, you can try adjusting your theme’s layout settings or checking for any conflicting plugins. Another solution is to edit your site’s CSS code and adjust the positioning of the sidebar manually. If none of these solutions work, you may need to reach out to a developer for further assistance in resolving this issue.

15. WordPress Keeps Logging Out:

One common error that WordPress users may encounter is being logged out of their account continuously. This can be aggravating, especially if you are working on your website. This is most likely due to a problem with your cookies or cache.

To resolve the issue, clear your browser’s cache and cookies before logging back into WordPress. If that doesn’t work, see if any plugins or themes have been updated recently, as these could also be causing conflicts. Another option is to use the “Lost Password” link on the login page to reset your password.

16. Mixed Content Error (HTTP/HTTPS):

The Mixed Content Error, which occurs when a website contains both HTTP and HTTPS links, is one of the most common WordPress errors. This can lead to security issues and cause some content to not load properly.

To correct this error, make sure that all links on your site use either HTTP or HTTPS consistently. You can also use plugins like Really Simple SSL to redirect all traffic to HTTPS. Furthermore, ensure that any external resources (such as images or videos) follow the same protocol as your site.

17. 404 Error on Images:

The 404 Error on Images is a common error that WordPress users may encounter. This happens when a server cannot find or access an image, resulting in a broken link and a missing image on your website.

You can try re-uploading the images to your media library or checking for typos in the file name or URL to resolve this issue. You can also use plugins like Broken Link Checker to automatically detect and repair broken links on your site. Also, ensure that your images are properly optimized for web use and that the appropriate permissions are set.

18. WordPress Stuck in Maintenance Mode:

Being stuck in maintenance mode is one of the most common WordPress errors. This can occur when you are updating your website or installing a new plugin and something goes wrong. To resolve this error, simply FTP into your website’s root directory and delete the. maintenance file. This will remove your site from maintenance mode and allow it to resume normal operation.

19. XML-RPC Exploits:

XML-RPC exploits are one of the most common causes of WordPress errors. These attacks can cause your website to crash or be hacked, resulting in data loss and potential reputation damage.

To resolve this issue, add a code snippet to your. htaccess file or use a security plugin that prevents these types of attacks. It’s also critical to keep your WordPress version and plugins up to date, as patches for known vulnerabilities are frequently released. Monitoring your site for suspicious activity on a regular basis can also help prevent future exploits.

20. Email Delivery Issues:

Email delivery issues are a common WordPress error that users may encounter. This can be frustrating, especially if you rely on emails to communicate with your audience or customers. The most common cause of this problem is incorrect SMTP settings in WordPress.

To resolve this, ensure that your outgoing server name and port number are correct. You could also experiment with a different email service provider or plugin to handle your emails within WordPress.

21. Error: Maximum Execution Time Exceeded:

“Encountering the ‘Maximum Execution Time Exceeded’ error stands as one of the common hurdles for WordPress developers. This issue arises when a script or process surpasses the server’s predefined maximum execution time, causing disruptions. To overcome this obstacle, developers can either enhance the maximum execution time in the server’s PHP settings or optimize the website’s code. An alternative solution involves the use of plugins like WP Maximum Execution Time Exceeded, which automates the adjustment of the timeout limit for a smoother development experience.”